472 Broome Street

New York NY 10013

Mon-Fri, 12pm-8pm

Sun, 12pm-7pm

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The Bright Side

· · · Comments

The Bright Side

Gregory Moncada and Kate Hush

Sep 9 - Sep 29  2017

Opening Reception: Thursday, Sep 21  2017  6-8pm

 

 

Gregory Moncada

Born, raised, living and working in New York, Gregory Moncada is a multi-disciplined visual artist and art industry professional working at Christie’s as lead art handler. Classically trained in Fine Arts in Florence, Italy and a work ethic learned from the streets and the fast paced work environments of New York City, Moncada has had constant involvement in creating and exhibiting art, as well as a hand in behind the scenes art world operations.

Gregory Moncada

Works of art begin with curious exploration and a trust in intuition. Gathered from the streets, antique stores and flea markets, paper ephemera is acquired as a result of keen observation and good luck. The found materials are stored away to exist as a tangible reflection of history and culture. Selected content is cataloged and scanned, stripped of their initial intention and prepared for an intervention. Paint is applied with experimental and gestural movements. Fluid and active mark making is balanced by rigid directional lines that restore order and focus on the subject. Obscured but complemented by colorful abstract expressions, reclaimed images transport the viewer to a surreal setting. By establishing links between beauty and anonymity, passion and intention, Italian heritage and American identity, the finished artwork offers a unique human signal and honest response to society.

Moncada is both patient and truthful with his work. The evolution and progression of the artist remain constant and consistent. The goal is to provide visually satisfying works of art that consider contemporary society and art history and empathy towards the viewer and their visual needs.

 

Kate Hush

Kate Hush speared in New York City via train, has held an interest in wicked women from birth, and first touched neon lighting the year Karen Black was taken from us. She is a quiet woman, and doesn’t wish for you to know any more.

Kate Hush

Triboluminescence is the creation of light through the breaking of bonds. There’s pulling, ripping, scratching, crushing, abrasion – and finally, radiance. When a diamond is cut it fluoresces blue or red, not unlike how a person could be described. He is feeling blue, or she is red with anger. In people, in objects, solid states are disrupted. These rips are the road to a blinding denouement.

This friction is what I capture in intricately thin silhouettes – bodies and scenery made of light. The men have suffered, and will suffer. The women are conniving and manipulative, naturally. Their tears are phony and their heels are high. I am brining to light, literally, their wicked ways. They are fiery, guileful, calculating, crazy … or is it just that their brightness is harder to shield? Others are rotten, are double crossers, and they are somehow forgotten. But when a woman produces sharpness it’s as if she yields a deep eternal cut. So why not capture that wound in light? I illustrate the moment when you realize you’ve followed her down the wrong road, right before the crash. You’re going to call the all crazy bitches anyway, so why not light them that way?

 

Inquiry: Michelle Yu  gallery@biggercode.com